Ingredients Glossary

Bark ingredient

Cinnamon / Cinnamomum verum

Native to Sri Lanka, Cinnomomum verum, is a small, slow growth evergreen tree, which is now grown across the world. The spice is obtained from the inner bark of the tree and used for culinary, aromatherapy and herbal use.

Its botanical name is derived from the Hebraic and Arabic term amomon, meaning ‘fragrant spice plant’.

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Traditionally used in Western Herbal Medicine to:

  • Relieve symptoms of indigestion
  • Reduce abdominal bloating
  • Relieve digestive discomfort
Traditionally

Since ancient times, this spice has been used for a variety of purposes including in food preparations as well as a variety of herbal uses. It was valued as a precious commodity and was so highly prized that it was regarded a gift fit for monarchs. It is believed that its source was kept secret in the Mediterranean world by those in the spice trade to protect their monopoly as suppliers.

Bark ingredient

Slippery Elm / Ulmus rubra

Native to North America, this medium-sized, fast growth tree is now grown throughout the world and is also referred to as Red Elm, Grey Elm or Indian Elm.

 

The plant’s bark and root are used medicinally for the soothing properties in the case of inflammation of the gastrointestinal tract.

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Traditionally used in Western Herbal Medicine to:

  • Support gastrointestinal mucosal membrane health
  • Soothe gastrointestinal tract mucous membranes
  • Relieve mild gastrointestinal tract inflammation
  • Soothe irritated tissues
Traditionally

Native Americans also used the bark to quench thirst by chewing the sweet, fibrous inner bark peeled from twigs and branches.

Bark ingredient

White Willow Bark / Salix alba

Native to Europe, Asia and North America, and now grown throughout the world, this tall, fast-growth, deciduous tree is also recognised as Brittle Willow or simply Willow.The name, White Willow, derives from the white tone to the undersides of the leaves. It is also a dioecious, meaning there are both male and female trees.

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Traditionally used in Western Herbal Medicine to:

  • Relieve mild fever and reduce body temperature
Traditionally

The use of willow bark dates to the time of Hippocrates when people were advised to chew on the bark to help reduce fever and inflammation.